Articles in Category: Fall Color

Punica granatum

on Monday, 24 January 2011. Posted in Attracts Pollinators, Fall Color, Edible, Shrubs, Drought Tolerant, Flowering Plants

Pomegranates

punica-angel-red-plant-of-w

pomegranate-angel-red-plantThe Rogue Valley climate allows us to get away with growing Pomegranates; with the possibility of getting fruit!  Unlike the Pacific Northwest, which generally doesn't get enough heat to ripen Pomegranates, Pomegranates will thrive in our longer, hot summers. We also usually don't get cold enough to damage them so give this Persian fruit a try!  They thrive in a hot, dry, and ideally protected spot (to make sure the fruit ripens) and the tropical looking bright orange flowers add an unusual element to any garden.   Against a south facing wall is best. We have seen some old specimens in Ashland and Central Point so we know once established they will make it through most any winter.  The key is to protect them if it gets below 20 degrees the first couple of winters.  Once established, a severe cold snap can kill them to the ground - however they regrow quickly from the roots.  Pomegranates have narrow, bright green leaves turning golden in the fall and frilly, saturated orange/red blooms.  Pomegranates make a great landscape plant even if you don't get fruit.  The fruit usually ripens in September or October.  You can grow them as a large shrub or small multi or single trunk tree; maybe getting to 15' at maturity.  They can be quite drought tolerant once established.  They are self-fertile and the nutritional benefits of pomegranates are well known.  Ask Scott if you want to know more- he is obsessed!

 

Pistachia chinensis

on Monday, 08 November 2010. Posted in Fall Color, Trees, Drought Tolerant

Chinese Pistache Tree

Pistache2smPistache trees deserve more use in the Rogue Valley - they thrive in our hot, dry summers, provide long lasting fall color, and have interesting leaf texture.

Chinese Pistache are used a lot as street trees in the hot valleys of northern California, giving us a clue to how they well they would work here,especially in urban situations.  Being a Zone 7 tree, the Rogue Valley usually doesn't get cold enough to cause any problems for the Pistache. Placing it in full sun, in well draining soil will help it survive any cold snaps.

pistacheThese trees provide a spectacular fall color show of reds, oranges, crimsons, and yellows. Chinese Pistache will tolerate regular irrigation but are also relatively drought-tolerant and require no summer watering once established. The form of Pistache is not very uniform when young but they get a nice, dense canopy with age.

Being a slow growing tree - on average they will be about 25-30' tall and wide - but much older specimens can reach 50' tall.  Pistache are prone to verticillum wilt if you have it in your soil (not overwatering will help avoid this problem) but are resistant to oak root fungus. This is one of our best choices for a drought tolerant shade tree that can be used in many situations. 'Keith Davey' is a named variety that is a fruitless male and has red-orange fall color. The straight species, if it is a female tree, will form blue to black berries. 

Sedum rupestre 'Angelina'

on Monday, 24 May 2010. Posted in Winter Interest, Evergreen, Fall Color, Ground Cover, Drought Tolerant, Flowering Plants

Angelina Stonecrop

sedum-angelina

We're always looking for a Sedum that looks good all year and this one gives a rainbow of colors throughout the seasons.  It's easy to use in a container or as an evergreen groundcover that is drought tolerant, cold hardy to Zone 3, and deer resistant (should be).  We have it dotted throughout a rock garden as a yellow and orange highlight against creeping thymes and hens and chicks.  A small piece of the plant casually planted (or dropped!) will easily root so you can spread it where you like.   Quickly gets to 15-18" wide and about 4" inches tall with yellow flowers in late summer.  The needle-like leaves will be more yellow in full sun and get red and orange highlights in colder weather and green up in more shade.  In spring it had green, yellow, orange, and red all on the same plant, just like a rainbow.