Articles in Category: Perennial

Euphorbias

on Wednesday, 30 September 2020. Posted in Winter Interest, Attracts Pollinators, Evergreen, Perennial, Deer Resistant, Drought Tolerant, Flowering Plants

Spurges

Euphorbia-with-Allium

Another plant we love to sing the praises of: evergreen, usually compact, deer resistant and drought tolerant - with flowers that last 3 months or more. And the only thing you have to do to enjoy them is to not overwater and prune the flower stems back to the base of the plant after blooming is done. This photo shows a Euphorbia characias variety with a Allium 'Purple Sensation' in the foreground. Flowering begins in early spring and will easily last into July. The flowers are set off by the larger bracts, thus lasting longer than a typical petaled flower. When flowering stalks start to brown or look faded, just prune the flower stem all the way to the ground so the new stems can fill in.

As an added bonus, Euphorbias are evergreen in all but the coldest Rogue Valley winters, and their foliage tends to color up in winter; providing a nice visual interest in the winter garden. Euphorbias will take full sun to half a day of sun and need well draining soil. They all have a white sap in their stems keeping the deer at bay but can also cause a rash in some people, so wear gloves when pruning Euphorbias.

There are many varieties of Euphorbia and here are some of our favorites that we usually carry:

Geranium 'Rozanne'

on Wednesday, 02 September 2020. Posted in Attracts Pollinators, Perennial, Flowering Plants

Cranesbill

Geranium Rozanne editGeranium ‘Rozanne’ is one of our very favorite perennial Geraniums. And honestly, who can blame us?

Most of the other hardy Geraniums we carry (Biokovo, Karmina, Ingerswen’s Variety) have white or pink flowers and prefer part to full shade. ‘Rozanne’, on the other hand, has lovely, large blue-violet flowers with red-violet stamens and ‘bee lines’, and grows happily in full sun.

‘Rozanne’ will get to 12-24” tall and wide and grows in a lovely, loose mounded shape. Plants are easy to grow and not at all fussy about soil – or much of anything else, for that matter. They’re also a good groundcover plant to use when developing a ‘firewise’ landscape. As an added bonus, ‘Rozanne’ has a nice long bloom season (late spring into fall). They’re especially effective in mass plantings, where they can create a soft island of cool blue color in the summer garden.

Perovskia atriplicifolia

on Friday, 14 August 2020. Posted in Winter Interest, Attracts Pollinators, Perennial, Deer Resistant, Drought Tolerant, Flowering Plants

Russian Sage

Perovskia edPerovskia or Russian Sage is one TOUGH plant. It's also quite beautiful, with fuzzy silvery-blue buds that open to blue-violet flowers; adding long lasting color and texture to your garden.

Perovskia’s gray-green, finely dissected leaves have a clean, pungent smell – reminiscent of sage and mint. And while humans find the fragrance enjoyable, deer do not – which helps make this plant quite reliably deer resistant.

This plant is incredibly drought and heat tolerant, and even looks pretty in the winter when the dried-out silhouette and open branching catches the frost. Perovskia is a woody stemmed perennial and does go winter dormant. It requires good drainage and full sun and make sure to not keep it too wet. We like to wait to prune it back until spring arrives so that the crown stays protected from the winter wet. When you see new growth emerge in mid spring that is the best to time to prune it back hard and freshen it up.

Perovskia’s soft-looking lavender-blue blooms pair wonderfully with other heat lovers like Yarrow, Rosemary, and Salvia, as well as ornamental grasses or Yuccas. Butterflies and many types of bees are attracted to the late summer flowers. The straight species (Perovskia atriplicifolia) gets quite large, as much as 4' tall and wide. But there are several newer varieties that stay more compact. We like 'Little Spire' at 2-3' tall wide and ‘Blue Steel’ at 1-3’ tall and 18-24” wide.

Crocosmia

on Wednesday, 08 July 2020. Posted in Attracts Pollinators, Perennial, Deer Resistant, Drought Tolerant, Flowering Plants

Lucifer crop edit

Generally, summer-flowering perennials fall into two groups: those whose flowers fall into the cool tones (blues, purples, soft pinks) and those with warm-toned flowers (reds, oranges, and bright yellows). Crocosmia flowers aren’t just warm-toned, they’re hot!

These fiery-colored flowers make a bold statement in the summer garden, at a time when most spring-blooming perennials are starting to fade in the heat.

Crocosmia x crocosmiiflora George Davison 2Crocosmia (also known as Montbretia) is a member of the Iris family and is native to South Africa – an area with a climate similar to our climate here in the Rogue Valley. They look a bit like a refined Gladiola, only with flowers held in graceful, arching sprays rather than on stiff, upright spikes. Plants are deer resistant, drought tolerant when established, and grow well both in the ground or in containers. For a really dramatic effect, consider planting Crocosmia in large drifts to bring a splash of vibrant color to your garden. Hummingbirds find these plants irresistible, and you’ll often see several of them working a large planting of Crocosmia.

If you are a fan of bringing fresh flowers into your home, you’ll be happy to learn that Crocosmia are also a great addition to the cutting garden. Not only do the flowers hold up beautifully, but their seed pods and long, narrow leaf blades can be used with striking effect in flower arrangements!

 

We carry three different varieties, ranging in color from a rich yellow to a brilliant red:

Lucifer’: Big and bold; ‘Lucifer’ gets from 3’ to 3 ½’ tall with vivid, scarlet flowers. Photo top left.

EmilyM edit‘Emily McKenzie’: ‘Emily McKenzie’ is a mid-sized Crocosmia, reaching between 2’ and 2 ½’ tall. Bright orange flowers darken to red near the throat, with a yellow center.

 

‘George Davidson’: This is the shortest of the varieties we carry. Plants tend to top out at around 1 ½’ tall. Orange buds open up to lovely, golden-yellow flowers. Photo top right.

Zauschneria cana

on Tuesday, 16 June 2020. Posted in Attracts Pollinators, Native, Perennial, Ground Cover, Drought Tolerant, Flowering Plants

California Fuchsia

zauschneria everetts choice small

Zauschneria - aka California Fuchsia - is one of the most drought tolerant, heat tolerant, pollinator-friendly, beautiful perennials you can grow. We're not sure why this western native is not used more: the hard to pronounce name, or that fact that you can kill it with kindness, perhaps? In any case, this lovely plant deserves a place of honor in more gardens here in the Rogue Valley! Ours begin blooming in early to mid-July and keeps going strong until we get a hard frost in late fall; putting on quite a show for us and the hummingbirds!

Zauschneria’s hot orange to deep red flowers are the quintessential “hummingbird flower”: long, nectar-rich floral tubes just perfectly shaped for a hummingbird’s slender bill. This is one of a handful of flowers I’ve seen actually hummingbirds bypass a feeder for! Plants bloom continuously and don’t seem to need any deadheading; the spent blossoms just neatly drop off the plant. In addition, the vivid orange-red flowers contrast beautifully with soft silvery gray foliage that fits perfectly into a drought tolerant garden. They look great when planted with Salvia, Agastache, Perovskia, Gaura, Eriophyllum, Monardella, and other drought-tolerant perennials.

Zausch editThis western native perennial is happiest in a well-drained soil (you see them naturally growing out of rock outcroppings), with full sun and infrequent water. They do especially well on slopes or at the edge of a rock wall. We like to leave up any dormant stems over the winter, to help them survive our wet winters and clean them up in early spring. The stems can be cut back after all danger of cold weather is past and the plant will grow back quickly to be full and vibrant by summertime.

When you see Zauschneria available in the nursery, grab them fast. We don’t carry them all year long and they sell out quickly! They are best planted in spring and summer, when they can have some time to get settled in before winter hits. Most varieties we carry are cold hardy to at least Zone 7b, about 5 to 10 degrees F.

zauschneria homepageHere’s a short description of a few of the varieties we carry:

Z. c. 'Calistoga'- 1' tall by 2' wide, one of the darkest orange (almost red) varieties with thicker, larger, more silvery leaves than most. Best planted on a slope.


Z. septentrionalis 'Select Mattole' - 10" tall and 24" wide or so. Very silvery, large leaves with a great spreading habit


Z. garrettii 'Orange Carpet' - 6" tall x 18" wide, a green leafed form that can take more afternoon shade and a bit more summer water. It is one of the first to bloom.


Z. ‘Everett’s Choice’ – 6” tall x 2-3’wide, with large vividly red flowers


Z. arizonica – 2-3’ tall, by 2’wide, with gray-green foliage and orange-red flowers¬. Hardy to Zone 5.